How Alcohol Interacts with LSD

How Alcohol Interacts with LSD

Mixing LSD with alcohol can result in extremely bad trips

Experimenting with drug combinations is dangerous, but people on alcohol binges often use other drugs simultaneously. However, such behavior can produce unpredictable – perhaps even deadly – scenarios. The effects of polydrug use can be quite different for each individual, therefore,mixing powerful drugs – whether they be illicit drugs or legal prescription medications – is a very risky undertaking.1

What Happens When You Mix Alcohol and LSD?

People who are party drug mixers may overlook how mixing alcohol with LSD can intensify or weaken the effects of either drug – in other words, rather random effects.

There are many reasons why drinking alcoholic beverages may add risk to taking LSD. For one thing, mixing LSD with alcohol can result in extremely bad trips, unpleasant experiences or flashbacks – reoccurrences of LSD experiences. They can occur without warning, even years after an individual has stopped using hallucinogens. Because of the unpredictable nature of LSD, it is difficult to know how it will affect someone that takes it with other substances.

Another argument for not mixing alcohol and LSD is that visual hallucinations may often decrease. As a result, users may drink more alcohol than what is normal for them without experiencing the same high. Since such users may erroneously believe they are still sober, they may continue drinking alcohol and using LSD in order to experience a satisfying high. However, this can prove to be fatal due to the increased risk of overdose. When alcohol blood levels become too high, the body can go into shock, which means that such users could die of overdose within hours.

Furthermore, mixing LSD with alcohol could render the users unconscious; if this should occur while driving or some other dangerous situation, it could prove fatal…for those users, as well as anyone else who is nearby. Even when not totally unconscious, if users experience frightening hallucinations while their reaction time is slowed down by alcohol, disastrous results may occur.

Lastly, it is important to note that certain drug combinations can also obstruct the effectiveness of certain medicines, which may prove to be lethal if users’ prescription medications are for life-threatening health conditions.2

Be Fully Aware of How Dangerous LSD Can Be…Mixed or Alone

Many people think LSD isn’t addictive in any way, but it can be…psychologically. In other words, people can become addicted to this drug in the same way that some people get addicted to gambling, marijuana or pornography. Because LSD is illegal, it must be purchased from an illegal drug dealer – an individual who may not know or care about selling potentially dangerous chemical cocktails. Experimenting with drug combinations on a regular basis can result in addiction, and it increases the chance that one dose may, one day, be lethal.3

If you or a loved one are battling drug addiction or alcoholism, it’s critical that you seek help immediately. Contacting a quality, reputable treatment center is an essential first step in the process. Our integrated, evidence-based program has earned acclaim in more than ten independent studies…and countless treated patients. When you call our 24/7 toll-free line, one of our friendly, knowledgeable team members will attentively and compassionately listen to you, address your questions and concerns, and offer some positive solutions to your specific needs and preferences. Recovery IS possible…with the right help. Thank you for considering our team of addiction specialists at this important crossroads in your life. You can trust us. We care…one person at a time.


1Weathermon, Ron, Pharm.D., et.al., “Alcohol and Medication Interactions”, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh23-1/40-54.pdf.

2“DrugFacts: Hallucinogens”, National Institute on Drug Abuse, https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/hallucinogens, (January 2016).

3“Physical and Psychological Effects of Substance Use”, National Institute on Drug Abuse, https://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/files/TrainingPackage/MOD2/PhysicalandPsychEffectsSubstanceUse.pdf.